John Knight, Revolutionary War Soldier Granville Co North Carolina and Smith Co Tennessee

by deb - January 17th, 2013.
Filed under: Genealogy. Tagged as: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

On the same day in August 1832 that John Knight filed his application for a Revolutionary War Pension, William Jones and Phillip Day, both citizens of Smith County, Tennessee appeared in and before the justices of the court of Smith Co, TN and stated that Day was in the service of the United States with John Knight in the five months tour spoken of by said Knight and that from their acquaintances with said Knight have no hesitation in certifiying that Day believed said Knight served the whole of the time stated in his declaration.

On the 4th day of September 1832 the clerk of the court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of Smith Co TN, Jonathan Beckett, gave his certificate and seal concerning the matter of the application of John Knight for a pension. 

The next papers in this packet  were the Brief in the case of John Knight.  Though most of the information repeats what John Knight gave in his declaration, it does note that the declaration was made “in court” , that John Knight did not appear disabled by bodily infirmity,that John Knight was engaged in “no battles”.   The brief further noted that John Knight’s statement was supported by traditionary evidence (first term of 5 months) proven by William Jones and Phillip Day.   Although the papers of John Knight were deemed to be authenticate in this brief, “INVALID” was on one of the next pages in this packet.

Next in the packet:  a letter from A. Fergusson, Carthage, TN, in March 1837 to J.L. Edward Esqr, that “more than one payment is due to John Knight as a pensioner…and the papers and proof have to be returned to Washington to be submitted to your examination..”

The final letter in this packet was written 4 July 1838 and reads as follows:  Dear Sir, Mr. John Knight a pensioner living in this county has frequently told me of the injustice that was done him in making out his declaration.  He thinks that he stated only six months as the amount of his service being told at the time that six months would get him the same pension that twelve months would.   Under this mistake he considers himself injured in this that he served in all more than fifteen months and was misinformed about the necessaty of stating the particulars of each tour of service.  He states the following tours of service:  1st a tour of six months under Captain Richard Taylor and Pleasant Henderson and William Gill Lieutenant Wm Knight Ensign Barnet Pulliam; 2nd tour was under Captain John Hendersonof Colonel Malmodey’s Regiment.  This tour he served three months.  This was duirng the spring when the battle of Guilford was fought.  3rd tour of  three months at Georgetown in South Carolina shortly after Genl Marrion had made an impression (?) on that place. 4th tour was under General Marrion near Mouhs(?) corner and at Man…(?) plantations of three months.  5th tour of two months at the same place last mentioned.  during this time the British evacuated Charlestown. 

You will be pleased to refer to his papers and see which of his before mentioned tours was admitted and on which he received his pension of $26.00 his present pension and ….(?) that he did not mention so that he can prove up the ballance of the tours of service due him and thereby get his full …pension he is entitled to and suggest the plan he is to pursue in order to get full arrears as may be due him.  With great respect I am yours, etc., A. Fergusson.  At the bottom of the page was James L. Edwards, Esqr Commissioner of Pensions Washington City. 

This ends the papers of the declaration of John Knight, who WAS awarded a pension for his service in the American Revolutionary War.

 

 

 

1 Response to John Knight, Revolutionary War Soldier Granville Co North Carolina and Smith Co Tennessee

  1. Ah, I thought, after reading/skimming the copy of John Knight’s papers that you gave me for Christmas, that he was still attempting to obtain a pension as late as 1837. As your transcript shows, though, he was receiving a partial pension and in 1837, via the letter written by A. Fergusson, was asking for full pension, and therein described all his tours of duty.

    I’m so pleased that you researched and uncovered this additional Revolutionary War soldier ancestor for us!
    Aunt Gale

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